2 Corinthians 12:11-21

(2 Corinthians 12:11-21) - “I will gladly spend myself and all I have for you...” Real ministry involves sacrifice. It involves giving of yourself in ways that are vulnerable and difficult at times. Again, Paul didn’t have to prove himself to these people, he’d already done so much to verify his status before God as …

Advertisements

2 Corinthians 12:1-10

It's one of my favorite verses. It's also one of the ones I cringe at the most. If you've been around church long enough, you've probably heard it at one time or another. Paul the Apostle finishes one of the most exhaustive lists of trials that a Christian could possibly go through in one lifetime. …

2 Corinthians 11

(2 Corinthians 11) - Real vs. False Apostles. Paul continues to defend his unique position from God as an Apostle. There were some who claimed to be servants of God that were combatting him and his ministry. The reason Paul keeps going on about all this is made clear in verse 2. He was jealous …

2 Corinthians 10

(2 Corinthians 10) - Boasting in the Lord. Paul again journeys to describe his personal ministry in the face of scoffers who disregard him and the work he does. Paul didn’t have to do this, he didn’t have to defend himself, but as I’ve mentioned before, he wasn’t doing it for his sake, but for …

2 Corinthians 9

(2 Corinthians 9) - You reap what you sow. Much of this teaching continues along Paul’s theme of generosity discussed in the previous chapter. A person who puts out a little effort in farming will get a small return. The higher the effort, the more likely you are to get a large return on that …

2 Corinthians 8

(2 Corinthians 8) - Joy leads to generosity Paul shares with the Corinthians about the loving generosity of the churches in Macedonia. Here are some of the characteristics of their joyful giving... - They gave beyond their ability. - They gave freely. Nobody had to twist their arm. - They begged for an opportunity to …

2 Corinthians 7

(2 Corinthians 7) - True Repentence Paul shares his desire with the Corinthians, that they would open their hearts to him and his team. It’s obvious that whatever the contents were of this “tearful letter” mentioned at the beginning of the book, it pained Paul to write it. He loved these people and didn’t want …